Posted by: James Wapotich | September 21, 2018

Trail Quest: Antimony and Eagle Rest Peaks

Hiked to Antimony and Eagle Rest Peaks a couple weeks ago. The trail to the saddle near Antimony Peak follows an old jeep road and is in good condition overall with some loose granite covering the trail on the ascent up to the saddle. The relatively short off-trail route east to summit is well-marked with cairns. Great views from the peak stretching east out towards the Tehachapi Mountains, north towards Frazier Mountain and Mount Pinos, and south towards Eagle Rest Peak, framed by the Southern San Joaquin Valley.

From the saddle, the old jeep road continues north and then north east a quarter-mile down to where the miners’ cabins were located.

Also, from the saddle, the off-trail route to Eagle Rest Peak continues north-northwest, following the ridgeline down to the peak. The route is fairly well-marked with cairns and, in some places, flagging. The wear pattern of the trail is remarkably consistent and in that regard is generally easy to follow. The full hike to both peaks is a somewhat strenuous roller-coaster of a hike, involving 2,900 feet of combined elevation loss and 2,400 feet of combined elevation gain on the hike out; the numbers are then reversed on the return hike. The final ascent to Eagle Rest Peak requires some rock scrambling, but also offers some great views of the surrounding area.

Article appears in section A of the September 17th, 2018 edition of Santa Barbara News-Press

Older articles can be seen by scrolling down or using the search feature in the upper right corner. Articles from the News-Press appear here a couple months after they appear in the paper.

Antimony Peak San Emigdio Mountains jeep road trail hike los padres national forest

Antimony Peak in the early morning light

Eagle Rest Peak hike trail San Emigdio Mountain San Joaquin Valley Los Padres National Forest

Eagle Rest Peak with the southern San Joaquin Valley in the distance

Eagle Rest Peak trail hike San Emigdio Mountains Los Padres National Forest

Scenery along the trail to Eagle Rest Peak looking east

Eagle Rest Peak hike trail san emigdio mountains los padres national forest

Scenery along the trail to Eagle Rest Peak looking west

Eagle Rest Peak trail hike san emigdio mountains los padres national forest

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Posted by: James Wapotich | September 4, 2018

Trail Quest: McGill Trail and the Perseids

Camped at McGill Campground at the height of the Perseid meteor shower. Stayed up late to watch the meteors and then hiked McGill Trail the next day.

McGill Trail leads through mostly Jeffrey pines with a mixed understory of snowberry and whitethorn ceanothus and other plants along the trail. The trail offers some great views out across Cuddy Valley towards Frazier Mountain, as well as out across Tecuya Ridge and the San Emigdio Mountains towards the San Joaquin Valley and southernmost Sierra Nevada. Also made a hike to Mount Pinos.

The Perseids are an annual meteor shower that peaks in August. They are definitely worth catching. Mount Pinos lends itself well as an ideal location for viewing meteor showers and the night sky in general because of the often clear skies and low light pollution.

The next upcoming meteor shower that is equally promising is the Geminids, which will peak at 4:30 a.m., Friday, December 14, with good viewing Thursday night starting shortly before midnight when the moon sets.

Article appears in section A of the September 3rd, 2018 edition of Santa Barbara News-Press

Older articles can be seen by scrolling down or using the search feature in the upper right corner. Articles from the News-Press appear here a couple months after they appear in the paper.

McGill Trail hike San Emigdio Mountains Tecuya Ridge Mount Pinos Los Padres National Foreest

The San Emigdio Mountains frame a view from McGill Trail

Jeffrey pines McGill Trail hike San Emigdio Mountains Tecuya Ridge Mount Pinos Los Padres National Foreest

Jeffrey pines are seen along McGill Trail

 

Posted by: James Wapotich | August 27, 2018

Trail Quest: Hot Springs and Buena Vista Canyons

Hiked both the Buena Vista Loop and the network of trails between Hot Springs and San Ysidro Canyons a couple weeks ago.

Buena Vista Trail is in okay shape up to the connector trails. The connector trail east up towards the Edison access road from Romero Canyon is in good shape past some initial fennel cluttering up the trail. The connector trail west over towards the Edison access road from San Ysidro Canyon has some slide damage just across the creek from the trail juncture, and then is overgrown with wild mustard much of the way up to the Edison access road. The access road is in great shape. All of the Edison access roads within the Thomas Fire burn area have been cleared. For the loop back to Buena Vista Canyon, Old Pueblo Trail is also in good shape having been recently worked by volunteers.

The trails between Hot Springs and San Ysidro Canyons are in great shape. The Edison access roads have been cleared and the lower trails and connectors were recently worked by volunteers.

For the article, I hiked Hot Springs Trail up to the old hotel site; then came down Saddle Rock Trail; took McMenemy Trail over to Girard Trail, and hiked the length of Girard Trail (great views of San Ysidro Canyon). From there, hiked the rest of McMenemy down to San Ysidro Canyon, returning back along Edison Catway and hiking the Hot Springs Loop Trail back to the trailhead. The burn damage is evident across the entire area, but there is a fair amount of plants coming back.

Currently all of the trails within in the Thomas Fire burn area have been reopened except Cold Springs Canyon, which remains closed including West Fork Cold Spring Trial. The upper portion of Cold Spring Trail, however, can be accessed from East Camino Cielo Road.

Article appears in section A of the August 20th, 2018 edition of Santa Barbara News-Press

Older articles can be seen by scrolling down or using the search feature in the upper right corner. Articles from the News-Press appear here a couple months after they appear in the paper.

Buena Vista Canyon Trail Thomas Fire Santa Barbara Montecito hike Los Padres National Forest

Buena Vista Canyon is seen from the trail

Buena Vista Canyon Trail debris flow Thomas Fire Santa Barbara Montecito hike Los Padres National Forest

Familiar rock feature shows the height of the debris flow

Hot Springs Canyon Trail Thomas Fire Santa Barbara Montecito hike Los Padres National Forest

Hot Springs Canyon is seen from the trail

McMenemy Trail Thomas Fire Santa Barbara Montecito hike Los Padres National Forest

The Santa Ynez Mountains frame a view along McMenemy Trail

Saddle Rock Trail Thomas Fire Santa Barbara Montecito hike Los Padres National Forest

Saddle Rock Trail

 

Posted by: James Wapotich | August 26, 2018

Trail Quest: San Ysidro Canyon

Made two hikes up San Ysidro Canyon. The first was during some ridiculously hot weather. Rather than push past the falls, I decided to follow San Ysidro Creek as it turns away from the trail, just before the falls. The off-trail hike quickly arrives at the confluence of two side creeks flowing into San Ysidro Creek. Prior to the debris flow, exploring each of these three canyons would’ve requiring pushing through brush and weaving around poison oak and downed trees. Now, however, it’s relatively easy to travel up each of the canyons. In one, I found fresh bear tracks, in another a pair of garter snakes, and in another a Humboldt lily with an impressive 28 flowers.

For the second hike I got an earlier start and quickly made my way back up to the falls. The trail is in good enough shape overall. All the Edison access roads have been cleared and although the creek and debris flow flooded across parts of the trail, volunteers and hikers have forged a viable route.

Past the falls the trail continues uphill through the more exposed section that leads to the top of the mountains. There are a number of slides areas that require care and slow going in order to traverse before the trail gets up on to the ridge that separates the side canyon with San Ysidro Falls from the main canyon. Here, trail conditions start to improve. About a mile before the top, the trail arrives at a steep slide section that is essentially impassable.

I also made a hike from East Camino Cielo Road down to the slide. The trail is in decent shape until just before the slide. It will likely be a while before the slide damage is repaired.

Article appears in section A of the August 6th, 2018 edition of Santa Barbara News-Press

Older articles can be seen by scrolling down or using the search feature in the upper right corner. Articles from the News-Press appear here a couple months after they appear in the paper.

San Ysidro Canyon Trail debris flow Thomas Fire damage Santa Barbara montecito hike los padres national forest

San Ysidro Canyon looking downstream

Humboldt lily San Ysidro Canyon trail Santa Barbara montecito hike Los Padres National Forest

Humboldt lily with 28 flowers

Papilio rutulus western tiger swallowtail on Humboldt lily Lilium humboldtii san ysidro canyon santa barbara montecito los padres national forest

Swallowtail on Humboldt lily

Papilio rutulus a pair of western tiger swallowtail on Humboldt lily Lilium humboldtii san ysidro canyon santa barbara montecito los padres national forest

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San Ysidro Canyon Trail debris flow Thomas Fire damage Santa Barbara montecito hike los padres national forest

Off-trail San Ysidro Creek

Posted by: James Wapotich | August 4, 2018

Trail Quest: Remote viewing Parma Park

Back in November my friend Dana loaned me one of his wildlife cameras. I had been meaning to get some so I could take them with me on backpacking trips. Recalling the advice of wildlife biologist David Lee, I first set the camera up in my backyard to get familiar with how it worked before taking it out into the field. I’d taken a class with David earlier that year on using wildlife cameras and learned a lot of useful tips that came into play as I got into using the cameras. The article I wrote about the class can be seen here.

After a successful run in my backyard, I began to wonder where else I could set one up. I eventually settled on Parma Park, which was close to where I lived, undeveloped enough, and not nearly as popular as the front country trails.

My first camera location didn’t pan out, even though it was located near a mountain lion kill. Learning from the experience, I found a spot with evidence of more animal traffic and set up my camera at an intersection of several game trails.

Three days after I set up the camera a pack of five coyotes wandered through. Other animals the camera recorded over the next three months included deer, skunk, rabbit, bobcat, and fox. Inspired by my initial results, I set up a second camera in Parma Park, which captured images of deer, bobcat, skunk, mouse, and a couple of birds. Overall, the most active wildlife in the park are the mule deer, specifically Odocoileus hemionus californicus, aka California mule deer or black-tailed mule deer.

Article appears in section A of the July 23rd, 2018 edition of Santa Barbara News-Press

Older articles can be seen by scrolling down or using the search feature in the upper right corner. Articles from the News-Press appear here a couple months after they appear in the paper.

Below are images from the first successful site.

Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking bucks santa barbara

California mule deer aka black-tailed mule deer

Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking buck santa barbara

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coyote Canis latrans wildlife camera tracking santa barbara

Coyote

coyote Canis latrans wildlife camera tracking santa barbara

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coyotes Canis latrans wildlife camera tracking parma park santa barbara

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bobcat Lynx rufus wildlife camera tracking parma park santa barbara

Bobcat

bobcat Lynx rufus wildlife camera tracking parma park santa barbara

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bobcat Lynx rufus wildlife camera tracking parma park santa barbara

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Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking buck

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Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking buck

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Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking buck

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Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking buck

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Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking buck

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Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking buck

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Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking buck

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Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking buck

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Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking does

Does

skunk wildlife camera tracking santa barbara

Skunk

grey fox Urocyon cinereoargenteus wildlife camera tracking parma park santa barbara

Grey fox

Below are some images from the nearby second site.

Odocoileus hemionus californicus California mule deer black-tailed mule deer wildlife camera tracking buck santa barbara

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bobcat Lynx rufus wildlife camera tracking parma park santa barbara

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bobcat Lynx rufus wildlife camera tracking parma park santa barbara

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mouse wildlife camera tracking parma park santa barbara

Mouse

Flicker Colaptes auratus wildlife camera tracking santa barbara

Flicker

grey fox Urocyon cinereoargenteus wildlife camera tracking parma park santa barbara

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Posted by: James Wapotich | July 9, 2018

Trail Quest: Romero Canyon

Recently hiked both Romero Trail and Old Romero Road making a large loop to the top of the Santa Ynez Mountains through the Thomas Fire burn area.

Both trails have been largely restored. The lower portion of Romero Trail along with all of Old Romero Road have been cleared. The upper portion of Romero Trail still requires some work but can be hiked with caution due to substandard trail conditions.

All of the front country trails have been reopened except for East and West Cold Spring Trails. However, the uppermost portion of East Cold Spring Trail is accessible from East Camino Cielo Road.

Article on Romero Canyon appears in section A of the today’s edition of Santa Barbara News-Press

Older articles can be seen by scrolling down or using the search feature in the upper right corner. Articles from the News-Press appear here a couple months after they appear in the paper.

Romero Creek Canyon Trail hike front country thomas fire burn area los padres national forest

Romero Creek

fire follower large-flowered phacelia old romero road canyon trail thomas fire burn area Los Padres national forest front country santa ynez mountinas

Fire follower, large-flowered phacelia can be seen along the trail

Romero Creek bridge flood debris flow damage thomas first canyon trail los padres national forest front country santa ynez mountains

The bridge across Romero Creek is no more.

Romero Trail canyon santa ynez mountains los padres national forest

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fire poppy Papaver californicum thomas fire burn area romero trail canyon santa ynez mountains los padres nation forest

Fading fire poppy

Old Romero Road Canyon Thomas Fire Burn area front country trails los padres national forest santa ynez mountains

Romero Canyon

 

Posted by: James Wapotich | June 25, 2018

Trail Quest: East & West Fork Lion Falls

Hiked to East & West Fork Lion Falls in the Thomas Fire burn area recently. Lots of wildflowers out there including Humboldt lilies. Not a whole lot of shade, but decent water at both East & West Fork Lion Falls, as well as Rose Valley Falls. The trail is in good shape, no downed trees or substantial ravel across the tread. Both East & West Fork Lion Camps are usable, but again not much shade.

Article appears in section A of the today’s edition of Santa Barbara News-Press

Older articles can be seen by scrolling down or using the search feature in the upper right corner. Articles from the News-Press appear here a couple months after they appear in the paper.

Lion Canyon Trail Thomas Fire Ojai hike Los Padres National Forest

Lion Canyon

Lion Canyon trail pre-Thomas Fire hike Ojai Los Padres National Forest

Lion Canyon, 2015

Rattlesnake lion canyon trail los padres national forest

Rattlesnake with 11 rattles out on the trail

Mariposa lily lion canyon trail los padres national forest

Mariposa lily

Farewell to Spring Lion Canyon Trail los padres national forest

Farewell to Spring

Turkish rug lion canyon trail los padres national forest

Turkish rugging

Humboldt lily lion canyon trail los padres national forest

Humboldt lily

Rose Valley Falls trail ojai los padres nation forest

Rose Valley Falls

 

Posted by: James Wapotich | June 4, 2018

Trail Quest: Santa Lucia Wilderness, Part 2

Went backpacking recently in the Santa Lucia Wilderness with my friend Casey. We hiked in along Lopez Canyon Trail; set up camp at Upper Lopez; and then day-hiked the balance of the trail up to East Cuesta Road. Lots of great water in the Lopez Creek, as well as in the small pools and cascades in Potrero Canyon and at Sulphur Pots. Also, plenty of poison oak along much of the trail and lots of cool bear sign on the different trees.

Article appears in section A of the today’s edition of Santa Barbara News-Press

Older articles can be seen by scrolling down or using the search feature in the upper right corner. Articles from the News-Press appear here a couple months after they appear in the paper.

Lopez Canyon Trail cascade Potrero Creek Santa Lucia Wilderness hike backpacking San Luis Obispo

Lopez Canyon Cascade near the confluence with Potrero Creek

California newt eggs lopez canyon santa lucia wilderness los padres nation forest

California newt and eggs

Lopez Mountain canyon trail hike Santa Lucia wilderness los padres national forest San Luis Obispo East Cuesta Ridge hike

Lopez Mountain is seen from Lopez Canyon Trail

Pacific starflower Trientalis latifolia lopez canyon trail Santa Lucia Mountains wilderness Los Padres National Forest

Pacific starflower

 

Posted by: James Wapotich | May 22, 2018

Trail Quest: Santa Lucia Wilderness, Part 1

Created in 1978, the Santa Lucia Wilderness covers 20,486 acres in San Luis Obispo County. The wilderness has just three trails, all within two hours of Santa Barbara.

Part 1 covers the 9-mile loop hike that can made connecting Big Falls and Little Falls Trails and includes a visit to the waterfalls found in the two canyons. Both falls are more impressive in years with more rain, and at the same time the road to the trailheads becomes more challenging the more water that’s flowing. There are 7 crossings on the way to the Little Falls Trailhead and another 7 from there to the Big Falls Trailhead. A high clearance vehicle is recommended.

Part 1 appears in section A of the May 21st, 2018 edition of Santa Barbara News-Press

Little Falls Canyon Trail Santa Lucia Wilderness hike los padres national forest

Little Falls

Little Falls Canyon Trail hike Santa Lucia Wilderness Los Padres National Forest

Little Falls Canyon

Big Falls Canyon Trail Santa Lucia Wilderness Los Padres National Forest

Big Falls

Big Falls Canyon Trail hike Santa Lucia Wilderness Los Padres National Forest

Big Falls Canyon

Big Falls Canyon trail hike Santa Lucia Wilderness Los Padres National Forest

Cascade Big Falls Canyon

Big Falls Canyon Trail hike Santa Lucia Wilderness Los Padres National Forest

“Middle Falls”

Part 2 will cover Lopez Canyon Trail and Sulphur Pots and Upper Lopez Camps.

Older articles can be seen by scrolling down or using the search feature in the upper right corner. Articles from the News-Press appear here a couple months after they appear in the paper.

Western pond turtle Big Falls canyon Santa Lucia wilderness Los Padres National Forest

Western pond turtle suns itself near Big Falls

Coast Live Oak Little Falls Canyon Santa Lucia Wilderness Los Padres National Forest

Coast Live Oak, Little Falls Canyon

 

Posted by: James Wapotich | May 14, 2018

Trail Quest: La Jolla Trail to Manzana Creek, Part 2

I hadn’t intended this as a two-parter, even though there were essentially two different aspects to the hike – overgrown trails and Cascade Canyon. What happened is the original article was too long and so I broke it into two separate articles.

Part 1 covers from Figueroa Mountain Road to Cedros Saddle and the route-finding and bushwhacking associated with hiking the middle section of La Jolla Trail and Zaca Spring Trail, both of which see very little use. The article easily could’ve included Sulphur Springs Trail if I had more space, although in reality it wasn’t that badly overgrown.

Part 2 covers from Cedros Saddle to the lower Manzana Trailhead. In some ways the article is Trail Quest: The Trails of Edgar B. Davison, Part 3 as confusing as that may sound. The Trails of Edgar B. Davison Parts 1 & 2 were inspired by reading Davison’s journal and matching up the various locations he described with their modern names and recounting the story of his career as one of the first rangers in our local area. His patrol area included the north side of Figueroa Mountain down to and including Manzana Creek. Parts 1 & 2 describe the network of trails in Fir Canyon and Munch and White Rock Canyons respectively, and reference Manzana Creek only in passing.

Horseshoe Bend Manzana Creek Trail backpacking hiking San Rafael Wilderness Los Padres national forest

The Meadow at Horseshoe Bend

Swim hole Horseshoe Bend Manzana Creek Trail San Rafael Wilderness backpacking hiking los padres national forest

Swimhole at Horseshoe Bend

This article, which appears in section A of the May 7th, 2018 edition of Santa Barbara News-Press, covers both Sulphur Springs and Manzana Trails which Davison also patrolled. The real inspiration however was feeling that I had located what he referred to in his journal as “Cascade Canyon”. The name doesn’t appear on any map that I’m aware of, but based on his description of it as “a miniature Colorado, being the narrow and precipitous outlet of two large canyons through the south wall of the Manzana” it seemed like it had to be the side canyon just upstream from Coldwater Camp.

And so on the second day of our trip, Curt and I explored the canyon, which does in fact contain a half dozen medium-sized cascades worthy on the name Davison gave the canyon.

waterfall cascade canyon San Rafael Wilderness Los Padres national forest Manzana Creek

Small waterfall in Cascade Canyon

Cascade Canyon San Rafael Wilderness Los Padres national forest manzana creek trail

Cascade Canyon

Cascade canyon manzana creek san rafael wilderness los padres national forest

Cascade and Pool, Cascade Canyon

Older articles can be seen by scrolling down or using the search feature in the upper right corner. Articles from the News-Press appear here a couple months after they appear in the paper.

Manzana Creek Los Padres National Forest San Rafael Wilderness

Manzana Creek

 

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